Monthly Archives: November 2018

Ups and Downs

While reading Twitter and Tear Gas we learn about the ways in which newfound technology is both helpful and hurtful to our society.The technology we have today, specifically social media, allows us to quickly and effectively pass along information and coordinate movements. … Continue reading

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Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child

Initially, I was unsure of how to frame this post. Having just read excerpted chapters from Barbra Ransby’s Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision I was swimming in a milieu of grassroots organizing and the … Continue reading

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The power of community

I think this book is extremely interesting and also important to read at this point in time. Tufekci discusses how communication has changed over time. People can organize and reach more people today than was ever possible in the past. … Continue reading

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A Digital Guide to Networked Protest

If there is one thing that Black Digital Humanities has trained me to do is to think digitally. What I mean is that this course has normalized for me the habit of reading a book and automatically considering the ways … Continue reading

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I Always Feel Like Somebody’s Watching Me

Reading Zeynep Tufekci’s Twitter and Tear Gas made me start to become paranoid all over again. After reading Algorithms of Oppression, I switched to DuckDuckGo as my primary search engine on my Macbook (I already rely on Firefox, using Safari … Continue reading

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Who is Feeling Optimistic? Response to Week 12 Reading

Is the glass half full or half empty? The subtitle of Zeynep Tufekci’s Twitter and Tear Gas invites us to read the book either way: The Power and Fragility of Networked Protest. Or both ways at once, of course, this … Continue reading

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 “Let This Be Your Home” Exploring the Great Migration, Philadelphia, and the making of the New North.

Introduction “It’s a funny thing,” realtor Isadore Martin recalled in 1984, “but in the South to own your own home was a very important thing.” The Great Migration Project explores the relationship between the ideologies, artifacts, and attachments involved in … Continue reading

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