Author Archives: Drew

Exploring Magical Realism: A Digital Spatio-Temporal Map of a Literary Genre

Before I summarize my grant proposal, I want to convey to everyone how much I enjoyed this course. Back in January I knew next to nothing about the digital or the public humanities, but the atmosphere in class was such … Continue reading

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Pinning vs. Layering: Qualifying Modes of Digital Time Travel

After class ended, I stayed behind and was finally able to successfully pin my Berg photos to the Newark350 collection on Historypin. Like all subpar digital cartographers behind their time, I celebrated my tiny victory alone. Except apparently there was a … Continue reading

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Drew’s Big Idea for a Digital Chicory

Not knowing all that much about Omeka, I’m not totally sure that what I propose in this post is viable, but I’m going to take a shot. After reading Brian’s post, in which he argues for themed collections, it occured … Continue reading

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Identifying and Overcoming Barriers to Progress in the Digital Humanities

Speaking very broadly, all four of our readings this week were, to a significant degree, written in response to cultural and technological changes that have occurred relatively recently, and each seeks to affect the ways in which DH accounts for, … Continue reading

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Funneling Crowds into Communities

It seems a detailed description of CESTA and Historypin’s third subproject, “500 Novels,” which I felt the most curious about, is missing from Voss, Wolfstein, and Young’s “From Crowdsourcing to Knowledge Communities: Creating Meaningful Scholarship through Digital Collaboration.” Anywho, I … Continue reading

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Week 6: A Two-Part Response

This blog post has two parts. The first is a very brief observation about “Engaging to Preserve: Building a Preservation-Minded Community through Twitter,” and the second is a sort of meditation on Suey Park and social media’s relationship to cultural … Continue reading

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A Brief Analysis of the University of Minnesota’s Voices from the Gaps Project

Note about this post: I’m a novice in terms of using and analyzing digital public humanities projects, so what follows should probably be taken with a proverbial grain of salt. Voices from the Gaps (or VG for short) is a … Continue reading

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